Steam room

The couple’s unique tiny house features a folding ladder and a steam room


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Having a small house built can be a stressful process: brainstorming different design ideas, deciding if you are doing it yourself or selecting a suitable builder from the many that are currently in business, as well as finding a good place to park your little one. home home when you are not traveling with it. Oh, and on top of that is the very important process of decluttering and downsizing, so whatever is essential will fit in. All in all, these are pretty mundane considerations when it comes to getting into the little lifestyle.

But sometimes the process can get completely derailed, as it did with Lindsay and Eric Wood’s little house. In 2017, after deciding they wanted to stop renting and start owning something of their own, the California couple hired a Utah-based cottage builder to build their dream cottage.

Sadly, the builder went bankrupt shortly after the couple shelled out $ 65,000, leaving them with a partially finished structure that they then had to salvage. Determined to “make lemonade out of lemons,” the couple ended up finishing the house themselves instead. After eight months of work, they now have a wonderful Tiny House, fully equipped with clever space-saving furniture, a “crawling” closet, a desk and a large bathroom with steam shower!

Discover the Tiny Home Tours walkthrough:

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Stretching 33 feet long, the exterior of the Woods’ small gooseneck house was made with a combination of durable standing seam metal siding and wood. The couple wanted to run large household appliances, a toaster oven, kettle and air conditioning. So they opted for a 1.3 kilowatt solar power system, with a lithium battery and an inverter. For this part, they recommend not to do it yourself, but to hire a specialist who knows what he is doing, not just any old electrician.

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Inside, the spacious 11-foot-high space of the house is divided into different areas. First up we have the kitchen set up along a wall, and it includes a full size refrigerator, propane range with extractor hood, toaster oven, all on a counter that Lindsay has herself. cut to accommodate a large undermount sink, as well as open cabinets and shelves for storage.

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Above the cabinets, the couple set up another long shelf, populated with baskets attached to the wall with carabiners when the house is in motion. When stationary, the baskets can be unhooked and lowered.

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Directly across from the kitchen is this intriguing set of nested folding tables. The small folding table serves as a work table or dining table for two, while the larger folding table can accommodate additional diners if needed.

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At one end of the house is the cozy living room, which is tucked under the couple’s mezzanine and is approximately 6 feet 7 inches tall.

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To climb into the attic, the couple use this neat folding ladder, which can fold up quite flat thanks to its smart hinge design.

Visits to small houses

At the top of the ladder, there’s even a handy built-in handle to make it even more secure.

Visits to small houses

The mezzanine has enough space to sit in the bed, in addition to the DIY Shou Sugi Ban shelves and two exit windows.

Back downstairs, we enter the luxurious bathroom, which features a space-saving angular footprint. The couple opted for a vanity unit with sliding drawers and a composting toilet. There’s also a full-size tub with a rainfall showerhead here, and it also functions as a steam room.

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Just beyond the bathroom there is a small staircase leading to the gooseneck part of the house. The couple added a braided rope handrail, which saves space in this rather narrow passage.

Past the sliding door we have what was once an extra bedroom, which the pair have now converted into an office space, adorned with reclaimed pallet wood for the wardrobes and a desk.

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The couple also transformed the remaining space above the bathroom into what they call a “crawl closet,” which has space to hang clothes, as well as to place their combination washer-dryer. . Just above the gooseneck we have the access door leading to the roof.

Visits to small houses

In the end, the couple must have spent around $ 105,000 in total on their certified RV home (including the upfront payment they made to the now defunct builder). To help others who might be confused about choosing the right builder or materials, the couple are now offering consultancy services, with the aim of educating and empowering those interested in the tiny lifestyle.

You can find them through their website, Experience Tiny Homes, and Instagram.


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